International Men’s Health Month originally started as Men’s Health Week, which is celebrated yearly during the week preceding and including Father’s Day. It honors the importance of men’s health and wellness. It was chosen for this specific time of the year to make use of the extra attention given to male family members near the holiday. Today, it is observed by men’s health activists throughout June.

It aims to educate the public on how to improve men’s health and provide convenient health services to men who would not receive such attention. This also includes increasing awareness, early detection, and treatment of preventable health problems such as melanoma that are common in men who are at their early 50s. Melanoma is the most dangerous form of skin cancer. They develop when unrepaired DNA damage to skin cells, caused by the sun’s UV rays or tanning beds, cause skin cells to mutate.

manFactors That Can Cause Melanoma

• Sun Exposure – Both UVA and UVB rays are dangerous to your skin and can induce cancer. Blistering sunburns in early childhood increases risk, especially if you live in areas that have a hot climate.
• Moles – There are two kinds of moles: The normal ones that are small and color brown and atypical ones, which can put you at risk of melanoma. Regardless, the more moles you have, the more likely you are to develop melanoma.
• Family History – Heredity plays a big role in melanoma. About one in every 10 patients diagnosed with the disease has a family member with a history of melanoma. Each person with a first-degree relative with melanoma has a 50% chance of developing the disease.

Melanoma Prevention Guidelines

• Take Cover. Avoid sunlight especially between 10 AM and 4 PM.
• Avoid Tanning And Never Use UV-Based Tanning Beds
• Cover yourself with clothing, including a broad-brimmed hat and UV-blocking sunglasses.
• Apply 1 ounce of sunscreen to your entire body 30 minutes before going outdoors.
• Examine your skin every month.
• See your physician every year for a professional skin exam.

This month gives health care providers, public policy makers, the media, and individuals, the chance to encourage men and boys to watch over their health. This includes regular medical advice and early treatment for disease and injury.

So, tell your husband, uncle, father, brother, son, nephew, or any other man in your life to #GetNaked and check their skin regularly for any new or changing spots. Encourage them to sign the pledge so they get regular reminders to take charge of their health.